Washing with heat – page 5 amsterdam rentals

the things that really surprised me about the heating of the bio was that the ‘floaties’ suddenly appeared out of an otherwise pretty clear brew, and once left to cool and settle and the floaties were filtered out, that there is some drop out in the bottom of the flask. I cant help but wonder if ‘floaties’ plus ‘dropout i amsterdam card’ = the goodies that washing removes. I will try to put some more time aside one night after work to see what happens if I wash a batch of heated fuel.

I was thinking Tony that I could put a pyro glass (old coffee plunger) in a pan on the bbq and heat the fuel up in that. I am not sure that the metal of the saucepan is the issue, but it would be nice to know if the floaties can be made to appear before amsterdam jordaan the fuel goes brown. either way I am kind of steering away from it all now, just because of the inherent dangers of 200 litres of very hot fuel just waiting to accept a flame / spark.

When I first started this train of thought I wasnt expecting such high temperatures to be needed. I was kind of hoping it would all happen somewhere around 70 degrees as the methanol was removed. and maybe it will if I keep it at 70 deg for longer?? hmm? but first things first, I need to know if what I have done by heating the fuel is a positive or a negative.

I repeated amsterdam events a third time and viola, around 180 degrees it goes brown and floaties appear. I cooled this one in some ice water to get it back to room temp, and the floaties remained in suspension. I then filtered it, and once again the clarity was exceptional. I left all of this amsterdam 2 days over night. note – I also filtered some un heated fresh bio to compare – and the clarity was also very good.

the cold filtered fuel is crazy clear. when I put a LED torch under it and shine it up through it, you would expect to see a shaft of light, but you dont, as there is nothing in suspension to pick up the light. very impressed. The next little experiment will to be do a wash on it and see if it is any different to the first heated but unfiltered washed sample amsterdam local time.

build a turk burner outside my shed, and plumb a copper line from the bio brewer to it with a small 12v pump on the cold side with a bypass and valve so I can regulate the flow. Pass the fuel through the turk burner in a copper coil, and then send back to the tank. install a digital temp gauge to monitor the output temp. I should be able to regulate the temp by adjusting the flow. find someway of working out the flow rate and then try to make this predictable at each batch so i can then just run the pump for a period of time, allowing for say 3 changes of tank volume.

I am looking forward to hearing some comments – good and bad on what I have done or what I could improve, or if the process has no value at all.The amsterdam pictures brown stuff is caused by the methyl ester polymerising. As it’s unsaturated it’s prone to this, and is promoted by heat (as it readily exceeds the otherwise substantial activation energy of the process). But in a broader sense (as I’ve attempted to explain before) the problem with this approach is azeotropes. In simplest terms, if you have a mixture of liquids, one doesn’t necessarily start to boil off when you reach its boiling point. And methanol is prone to this more than most chemicals due to its small size and amsterdamse bos propensity to hydrogen-bond with other organic molecules. https://www.drchemical.com.au/uncategorised/biodiesel

The floaties do not appear to be brown. they appear to be a whispy whitish. they are the same density as the body of the fuel, i.e. they do not sink or swim. they stay suspended nicely. the total body of the liquid changes to a brown hue, completely evenly distributed. there is a slight amount of brown dropout that appears on the bottom after a few hours though, looks exactly like glycerine sitting in the bottom. intersetingly the sample that was hot filtered had more amsterdam weather in april dropout than the sample that was cold filtered.

interesting point about the components not boiling off at their respective temperatures. dont forget Mark, a lot of us are not classically educated and our eyes glaze over with use of terms we are completely unfamiliar with – such as ‘azeotropes’. we sometimes need a lay explanation to assist (as you have done so in the post above amsterdam van gogh museum – thankyou).

given your access to good gear and a scientific approach, would you mind please heating up some unwashed bio (made with a single stage method) to around 180 degrees and putting some comments on as to what you observe? I know this is putting you out, and completely understand if you dont have the time or inclination, but I’m sure nh amsterdam barbizon palace the broader community would benefit from the experiment being done properly rather than done on a greasy old bbq outside in the wind with more variables than you can imagine.

G’day Cade, this may not be relevant in this case, but may add some light to what’s happening. Have only ever heated BD when drying on the sun, but have heated VO to almost boiling temp to see what happens amsterdams verrekenbeding to the oil. Have seen those white floaties when it goes over 200deg C and wondered what they were, when the temp goes over 210degC, they disappeared. Have also found when the VO is heated over 206degC, it turns a bit brown, almost like it is burnt. It really thins the oil and stays that way and there is a lot of fatty stuff in the bottom when it cools down. Some one told me it wasn’t fats, but some other stuff which should be removed amsterdam youtube during the oil processing, it might have been silicate or something similar and is in the fibre of the seed.

I tried the heating method to see if it made it easier to work with and it did, but the centrifuge does the job with a huge reduction in labour and time, stopped doing that. It was a bit dangerous when the oil started to evaporate above 216degC. When I make BD again in a couple of months, will amsterdam dance event heat it up to see the results and let you know if you haven’t work it out by then.

The floaties do not appear to be brown. they appear to be a whispy whitish. they are the same density as the body of the fuel, i.e. they do not sink or swim. they stay suspended nicely. the total body of the liquid changes to a brown hue, completely evenly distributed. there is a slight amount of brown dropout that appears on the bottom after a few hours though, looks exactly like glycerine sitting in the bottom. intersetingly the sample that was hot filtered had more dropout than the sample that was cold filtered.

interesting point about the components not boiling off at their respective temperatures. dont forget Mark, a lot of us are not classically educated and our eyes glaze over with use of terms we are completely unfamiliar with amsterdam lounge – such as ‘azeotropes’. we sometimes need a lay explanation to assist (as you have done so in the post above – thankyou).

given your access to good gear and a scientific approach, would you mind please heating up some unwashed bio (made with a single stage method) to around 180 degrees and putting some comments on as to what you observe? I know this is putting you out, and completely understand if you dont have the time or inclination, but I’m sure the broader community would benefit from the experiment being done properly rather amsterdam icebar xtracold than done on a greasy old bbq outside in the wind with more variables than you can imagine.